representing building managment, cleaning and security staff

About BSCAA

BSCAA is working for you

If you’re in the cleaning business and you’re not familiar with the acronym BSCAA, then you should be. It’s a bit of a mouthful but it stands for Building Service Contractors Association of Australia, and it’s the nation’s peak industry body for the building services industry. That encompasses all businesses involved in contract cleaning, security, facilities management, grounds maintenance and related services. 

In essence, it’s a 100 percent Australian-owned and run industry association – which you might be surprised to find is not always the case – that’s been working to represent the rights of its members and advocate for industry improvement for more than 50 years. In many ways it’s the voice of the industry in Australia. The Association also works closely with a variety of suppliers to the industry to ensure members are at the forefront of industry innovation.

A strong industry is built on strong representation

So what does the BSCAA do? Well, as the highest-level body for the industry, it provides important advice and guidance to government and non-government bodies alike. For example, in July the BSCAA national branch made a submission on behalf of BSCAA members at the inquiry into the exploitation of general and specialist cleaning workers in retail chains for contracting or subcontracting cleaning companies. ABN reform and the expansion of the taxable payments reporting system to contractors in the courier and cleaning industries are other areas where the Association is actively pushing for the benefit of members. It’s this kind of advocacy that is essential to the strength of the industry.

The capacity to advocate at this kind of level comes back to the fact that the Association is staffed by a very active board of business owners and individuals with a wealth of experience in the industry. What’s more, BSCAA has national and state-based committees so it can effectively track and engage with issues at both a state and federal legislative legal.

But that advocacy doesn’t stop there. Beyond Australian shores, BSCAA also performs an important function on the world stage as a representative association on the Board of Directors for the World Federation of Building Services Contractors Association.

Working for businesses large and small

One of the key functions of the Association is to actively represent the needs of its members, large and small, and advocate for the benefit of the industry in national industry committees such as CAF – the Cleaning Accountability Framework – where BSCAA works to ensure that the interests of cleaning companies is effectively represented.

Another of the Association’s missions is to maintain the professionalism and skills of those who work within the industry. Its suite of training programs is a big part of this. The courses that can be completed either online or in-house provide a comprehensive education pathway and are designed for people seeking a professional cleaning career, with modules starting at the foundational basics up to an industry-recognised and Australian Standards certified Certificate III in Cleaning Operations qualification.

Industry involvement is critical

As for any industry advocacy organisation, involvement of industry participants is crucial to its success. For its part, BSCAA provides its members with a variety of services in addition to its accredited training program. The services the Association provides its members includes access to an industrial relations adviser for employee issues; partner and supplier discounts on things such insurance coverage; an awards program where members can nominate employees for excellence; regular news updates and immediate updates on important issues affecting members and the industry; as well as the opportunity to network and share experiences with industry peers.  

The pursuit of professionalism and excellence

Keeping members abreast of the latest developments in the industry is another key function of the Association. BSCAA’s free live seminar series is particularly popular with members. It provides a valuable forum to learn about and discuss important industry topics and events, as well as chance to connect with industry peers in a relaxed environment.  

But by far the highlight of the year is BSCAA’s annual Excellence Awards. It’s here that members get to strut their stuff and share their successes of the past year with their peers. There’s an Awards ceremony held in each state, so members from across the country have a chance to be part of the biggest social event of the year.  

In summary…

What is BSCAA

The BSCAA is Australia’s peak industry representative body for the building services industry. Our Association members include contractors for cleaning, security, facilities management and grounds maintenance.

The BSCAA provides leadership for members and the provision of a range of relevant and quality services. We seek to work with Government and other industry stakeholders to improve the professionalism of the industry and all those that participate within it.

BSCAA Vision

To strengthen our status as the peak representative body for building service contractors, to be a valued partner of other building stakeholders and to provide a conducive environment to enable member companies to be secure, profitable and good corporate citizens.

History

Our Association was chartered in 1964 as a mutual, not-for-profit organisation to represent and support the building services industry.

For some 50 years the Building Service Contractors Association of Australia has been helping member contractors in the building services industry to survive and to grow. Our membership is predominantly “small business” and our focus is on helping solve problems and reduce the amount of time spent on administration.

Being in business is a challenge and the building services sector is a tough challenge.

BSCAA works for its members to improve their bottom line and keep them on top of changes in award requirements, legislation, health and safety issues, public liability insurance, codes of practice and all other issues that have the potential to divert members away from the real business of building services.